Make learning a tactile and touchable experience

Alchemie is working to build Kasi a new learning system that combines physical objects and computer vision technology to provide a multi-sensory exploration of the microscopic world of chemistry.
A close-up image of the kassie system's atom, bond, lone pair, and charge pieces (currently in development). Each piece has extruded details to help blind or visually impaired individual differences between each piece, for example, the atom pieces have extruded letters and braille and the bonds have extruded rectangles.
Kasi will immerse students in hands-on experiences for various subjects, starting with chemistry. The common lack of prior knowledge form everyday experiences and the visual nature of the subject makes chemistry challenging to learn, especially for blind and visually impaired (BVI) students. Kasi is critically important for those students because they only have touch and sound to make sense of the sub-microscopic world of chemistry.
A gif showing two clips of Nicole Kada, Alchemie's blind consultant, testing the Kassie system and the specialized pieces. The animation on the left shows Nicole showing off a water molecule that she made using the kassie set. the right is a close up of her testing the braille and extruded letters on the pieces.
Nicole Kada, Alchemie's Blind Consultant, has been vital in the development of KASI. Learn more about her by visiting her Youtube Channel and Twitter.
Here is a sneak peek of our development with Nicole Kada, one of the accessibility consultants working on this project.
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Phase I of this project was funded by the Department of Education.